Online Betting Guide

New York among several US states ready to legalise sports betting

New York sports betting hearing

NEW YORK is among several US states preparing for a positive ruling on sports betting by the Supreme Court (SCOTUS).

The state has announced plans for a hearing, held by the Senate Racing, Gaming and Wagering Committee, to discuss the potential of sports betting.

It’s not clear if the hearing, taking place on January 24, will consider online sports betting, which Pennsylvania passed last year, provided the SCOTUS rules in favour of New Jersey.

SCOTUS will determine whether America should repeal a ban on sports betting in June. The case has been brought by NJ after the four major sporting leagues (NHL, MLB, NFL, and NBA) and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) mounted a legal challenge against the state’s attempts to add sports betting to race tracks.

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Sports betting is illegal in every state in the US, excluding Nevada, Delaware, Montana and Oregon. These four states amended legislation before the 1991 deadline and the enactment of the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act.

If the Supreme Court rules in favour of NJ, several states have already put in place the appropriate legislation, including Mississippi, to allow residents to bet on their favourite sports.

A recent report by gaming analysts, Eilers & Krejcik Gaming, predicts that a total of 18 states will introduce bills this year, estimating 11 will likely pass.

But the report suggests that it’s just the beginning, with more than 30 states potentially introducing US sports betting legislation.

Eilers & Krejcik Gaming managing director, Chris Grove, said that if SCOTUS permits it, there will be a simultaneous expansion of sports betting.

Pennsylvania has already passed a bill in preparation of a regulated sports betting industry, along with Connecticut. Indiana and Kentucky aren’t far behind, both recently introducing legislation.

Indiana’s bill has caused some controversy since surfacing, with the inclusion of an integrity fee. One percent of the total betting handle at sportsbooks in the state will go to sports leagues, with the additional 9.25 percent in tax wagering operators have to pay, as outlined in the bill.

Other states listed as likely to introduce a sports betting bill include:

Texas is reportedly unlikely to introduce a sports betting bill, according to local media outlets. Texas Governor, Greg Abbot, is reportedly indifferent to regulation, despite the boost to the economy and the estimated creation of more than 9000 jobs.

Other states unlikely to adopt sports betting include;

Director of the Center for Gaming research at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, David Schwartz, said these predictions are in line with states looking to gambling as a source of revenue.

Industry analysts have also predicted a favourable ruling will open the floodgates to an online gambling expansion as states move to offer sports betting online.